Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

Merry Christmas!!!

December 3, 2016

saltshakersnowbw

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Walsh Archival Video is now open for business!!!

February 25, 2015

Here is the first flyer for Walsh Archival Video!!! You can click on this link for the flyer to view or print it out in PDF format:

VIDEOTAPE TRANSFERS

Don’t let your old videotapes sit on the shelf! Walsh Archival Video features affordable, high-quality transfer of videotapes to digital files you can store and play on your home PCs, tablets, smartphones or other devices.

Currently we are transferring VHS, VHS-C, 8mm Video, Hi8, Digital8 videotapes and audio cassettes too. Other formats coming soon. Please inquire for updates!

Transfer rates start at $20 for the first tape and $10 for each additional. Rates can be discounted 15% for large collections of five tapes or more. Price includes digital discs for you. Transfers can be made to your provided digital media or uploaded to the Internet too at no additional charge!

FREE PICK-UP & DELIVERY WITHIN DAUPHIN AND CUMBERLAND COUNTY!!!

Or, mail your tapes. You will be billed for the cost of return shipping.

NOW ACCEPTING CASH, CHECK OR PAYPAL PAYMENT

SATISFACTION GUARANTEED

All of our transfers are monitored for quality. We will not accept damaged tapes. We cannot reimburse for videotapes that break during transfer or shipping. Quality is dependent upon the videotape. There are no charges for tapes that prove damaged or cannot be transferred.

walsharchivalvideo @ gmail.com

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10 Things I love about France

January 10, 2015

France is in my thoughts and heart today in light of their time of crisis. I am fascinated by many cultures but the francophile in me is surely strong. I feel attachment to France although I never been. In my childhood French culture, far more than now, was celebrated and held as more refined and slightly exotic. That view stay with me. My Great-Grandma passed through there on her way to a better life. She picked up a bit of the language on the way. Two of my Grand Uncles went there in World War II and changed from young men into the greatest of heroes.

Today I am teaching my kids about France and French culture. Here’s ten more things about France I’d clasp a beret to my heart on any day.

10. Art – “Have you heard about the painter Vincent Van Gogh? The man loved color and he let it show.”

9. Music – With apologies to Tchaikovsky and others, as for the Romantic period of classical music, they nailed it.

8. Philosophy and other discourse on what it all means to be alive and human. I think about that Candide nearly every week. Madame Bovary now and again too.

7. Bread. In my opinion lox on a bagel is nice but on french bread is best. They have mastered food from aperitif to dessert and all in between. Coffee too. And the king of soda waters: Perrier.

6. Without any possibility of argument, they have given the world the knowledge of true love. All kinds. The highs and lows. The immutable worth and joy.

5. Automobiles – In a world of generic automobiles they have and still make cars from the left field. Someday I wish to have a Deux Chevaux of my own. Love their planes and trains as well.

4. Their Language along with their pride in it – All other European languages, including English, sound like somebody strangling a goat in comparison to French.

3. Statue of Liberty – You ever notice she just gets prettier as the years pass by?

2. French movies – Got me through some hard times. Made me laugh and make me cry. In the words of a wiser man, “And taught me a little bit about myself.”

1. La Marseillaise – Sends a chill up my spine. Puts a tear in my eye. Make me proud to be free. Reminds me what it takes.

Croton stretching for some light

December 29, 2014

20141229_081809

Presents

December 25, 2014

Splendid holiday

But curious for sure.

Sometimes you land

Not where you forethought.

Instead, for the better,

Where you ought.

Sometimes,

It’s a good thing;

There is no room

At that Inn.

The Bug-In Bag

January 4, 2013

Welcome 2013. Glad to see we are all mostly still here. Honestly though, for all the hype, I don’t know a single soul in my circle who sincerely thought that 2012 was destined to be the end of all things. Maybe that speaks to my cloistered self, but I’d rather think it was just all a humbug.

It does give me fodder to ruminate upon though. I don’t watch or read the news much but I have caught a few stories about folks who are preparing for the end of days, squirreling away things that might somehow help in imagined scenarios, economic collapse, peak oil, epidemics and all.

That sounds like a nice hobby but it’s not for me. I don’t want an emergency “Bug-Out Bag” filled with things like dehydrated food, weapons, twine and batteries. If I could make a resolution for this New Year, I’d prefer to “bug-in” big time thank you. Be more engaged, available and tuned-in. It may not seem too hard a thing to do to most people, but as I am a bit of a hermit making connections in the world isn’t my forte. Instead it is something I’ll readily admit I fear on an active level. It’s not the path of least resistance for me but I’d like to spend the rest of my days in the flow of life, not trying to build some island.

I’ve often wondered if I ought to carry a bag of things that can be helpful in the lives of others. Let’s call it a “Bug-In Bag”. Instead of a tin of tuna and a bottle of water for me to eat in a ditch post-Armageddon alfresco, this kit will instead contain items that other folks I meet in my day-to-day journey might need.

The big open-ended question is “what goes in the bag”? I expect that everybody has a different idea of what the world needs ready at hand. My list is bound to change too over time and I’m open to suggestions. I’m starting with…

(1) Leatherman Multi-tool
(2) Pack of Wrigley’s Double-Mint gum
(3) Packet of Kleenex
(4) Spare $5 cash
(5) Sewing kit
(6) Band-Aids
(7) Hand wipes
(8) Pen
(9) Notepad
(10) Deck of playing cards

There. A good start. Most items available at a $1 store. Not going to take up much space in my murse or motorcycle bag. Friends I’ve told about this post suggested the inclusion of a packet of nuts, tobacco, chocolate and a divination tool e.g. I Ching coins or runes. I’m personally not prognosticating that any of these items will definitely be useful to somebody someday but here’s hoping. Sometimes I believe in synchronicity and karma but sometimes I just don’t know. I do know I am curious to see what happens.

Back on the road

July 15, 2012

Lovely ride today. As the weather was a bit ominous, I stayed pretty close to home. I rode up 11/15, north to Duncannon, to the “Sled Works”. It’s my favorite antique haunt and I can malinger there for hours just looking.

Bit of a hot day. Thankfully they had a Big Ben Sarsaparilla from Catiwissa, PA waiting there for me.

Antique-ing on a motorcycle is terribly sensible you see; can’t really buy anything too big because you cannot bring it home. Finn broke one of his Hot Wheels this morning so I was able to bring him home a couple replacements. I found him a cool Outer-Space Van and a Volkswagen “Thing”.

The bike got a good shakedown. I put a lot of work into her lately and she seems in good shape. Good mix of stop ‘n go traffic and country two-lane black-top on my route. I took it slowly and spent some time to review my invaluable Motorcycle Safety class lessons. On the way home I took highway 322 to make sure she’s willing on the top end too.

Great to be getting some more miles under my butt. It feeds my soul.

 

Bike repairs

July 13, 2012

Put a new battery in the bike today and it fires right up. I’m a bit worried my electrical system, specifically the stator, might be bad and won’t charge it. That concern is unfounded by the evidence at hand. The old battery just wouldn’t charge up at all on the charger. However, it’s kind of my nature to worry about the next thing up the chain after fixing something further down.

Put in a new speedo cable. Although it’s a bit drizzly, I took a quick ride around the block to make sure it worked. There again, I was worried that the clockwork gear either on the wheel or in the speedo itself may have been damaged. I put the bike back in the garage with a smile on my face.

Didn’t have time to get the inspection sticker. Now that the instruments work, I ought to be good to go. I had to spend much precious time and work getting that bike out of a state of neglect, largely due to a busy Spring, illness and stress. I feel a few miles under my butt ought to perk me up, get me in gear.

Even just working on the bike though makes me pretty happy. But it’s certainly nothing compared to the euphoria of a good ride.

Coming back in the house, I found to my surprise that my lovely wife had completed much work on a portrait of me. She used our favorite photo together as a basis. I was very impressed with her skill and really love it. She is thoughtful, supportive and kind. Puts everything in perspective for me.

Sorry, but everything is broken this week.

July 11, 2012

I just figured out my Civic has a dodgy interlock switch under the dash after my favorite mechanic hosed me for a new solenoid a couple weeks ago. Madre de dios. If I ever go to a mechanic again, I swear and promise to Saint Columbine himself it will only be after I have torn apart the machine and figured out what the exact issue is myself, forever and ever, amen.

Or, I’ll just drive old stone-age machines I can bodge and tinker together myself.

As for my stone age bike, my speedo cable snapped and I am waiting on a new one to allow me to pass inspection. I spent June wobbling around with a viral ear infection and I’m pretty damn anxious to start my riding season. So far the engine is running better than it ever has while the suspension and tires feel great. I replaced a broken drive hump on her and it seems to be ticking along quite nicely indeed.

I’ve also started to care more about appearance. She’s a good girl and deserves to look her best. Lots of ArmorAll-ing, lubricating, Meguire’s-ing going on in the shed. While I was at a local bike shop on Monday, a kind stranger told me that he’d rather my Kawa’ than his neat vintage 650 Yammie twin! That’s about the second compliment I ever received about my bike and it kinda really felt awesome! I want more! Next step is a full-on wheel cleaning and polishing. Thereafter, repainting dodgy spots here and there. Then, perhaps a engine paint job.

I bought the old beast with a battery in it. I got four years out of that barely charging, acid-dripping piece of junk. This year I am getting a nice sealed gel battery. I hope it works out and the hi-tech battery doesn’t mind being in an old school bike.

Also this summer I’d like to replace old hoses and cables for some preemptive headache avoidance. And maybe a nice valve job!

Garage is working out well as a work-space. Just enough room to work on the bike but I could use a bit more. Hopefully I’ll get a day in soon to sort, eject junk, and come up with more elegant “storage solutions” for all my accumulated oils, unguents, pieces, parts, gidgets and gadgets.

Farewell moldy drywall and bizarre ancient wall covering material!!!

December 12, 2011

With the help of two strong volunteers (thanks guys!) I finally got rid of the rest of the foul wall covering in the garage. I did find some hidden, fixable problems, but I am grateful that the bricks look fine.

When I bought the house, the inspector found a termite issue in there and it was subsequently treated. Now the extent of the damage has been exposed. The wall studs, unlike the the other ones I have already seen so far, look terrible. Many are completely just plain all-gone at the bottom, poof! From what I can tell, the rot was caused by a combination of water damage from when the roof was leaking plus a massive bug colony. And maybe birds, squirrels, or other fauna. Gross!

Although I am not keen on putting up new drywall, I do suspect that a future owner may want to go that way. I do know however I would like sturdy wall studs in there to hang up shelving on. I have lots of tools and solvents that need to be kept far away from the kids and a few prized decorative knick-knacks as well.

The wood that remains will need a good twice-over to determine what can stay and what can go. It might be tricky work too as the wooden frame for the drop ceiling tiles I ripped out remains in place and rests upon a beams running atop the studs. I’d like to somehow put in some new studs and with no daughter-boarding too.The ceiling frame is neat, and might look fantastic after a cleaning and straightening. It might even have a degree or two of utility value left it for supporting light objects like chicken wire, tomato plant sticks, fishing rods, etc.. Lots of scraping and staining ahead I suspect.

Great to have more work space in there. The fellas helped do a good clean-and-sort job thereafter. I hope the garbage men are sympathetic to my struggle today; we left them several cans of scrap and gypsum board to dump. I figure though they charge me top dollar for “waste removal” so tough-darts. We filled every receptacle I have, so I’ll be sure to fill-up a couple more with the remaining detritus sitting by my wood-pile for them.

Once the new boards are in, it’s time for new electrical wiring! After that, I’ll need to call in an inspector to check that out before it can go live. Until then, I’m still using a giant extension cord attached to the back of my house and it surely sucks.

But, now the dust has cleared a bit, it is starting to look very, very nice in there, relatively speaking of course. Lots more space has been freed up and they’ll be even more after I bust up a broken IKEA wardrobe; I plan to use the fiberboard pieces for a table-top on my homemade work table. The joint could use a good shop-vac treatment to suck up all the dusty bits, followed by a good mopping. Part of the floor is covered by a neato sticky-tile floor treatment that I bet would look great with a bit of waxing.

Once it’s immaculate in there I feel it’s time for a space heater. No reason not to work in there just because it’s cold!